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Acupuncture: Review and Analysis of Reports on Controlled Clinical Trials
(87 pages)

Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
Open this folder and view contentsIntroduction
Open this folder and view contents1. General considerations
close this folder2. Review of clinical trial reports
close this folder2.1. Pain
View the document2.1.1. Head and face
View the document2.1.2. Locomotor system
View the document2.1.3. Gout
View the document2.1.4. Biliary and renal colic
View the document2.1.5. Traumatic or postoperative pain
View the document2.1.6. Dentistry
View the document2.1.7. Childbirth
View the document2.1.8. Surgery
View the document2.2. Infections
View the document2.3. Neurological disorders
View the document2.4. Respiratory disorders
View the document2.5. Digestive disorders
View the document2.6. Blood disorders
View the document2.7. Urogenital disorders
View the document2.8. Gynaecological and obstetric disorders
View the document2.9. Cardiovascular disorders
View the document2.10. Psychiatric disorders and mental disturbances
View the document2.11. Paediatric disorders
View the document2.12. Disorders of the sense organs
View the document2.13. Skin diseases
View the document2.14. Cancers
View the document2.15. Other reports
View the document3. Diseases and disorders that can be treated with acupuncture
View the document4. Summary table of controlled clinical trials
View the documentReferences
 

2.1.4. Biliary and renal colic

Acupuncture is suitable for treating acute pain, provided the relief of pain will not mask the correct diagnosis, for which other treatments may be needed. Biliary and renal colic are two conditions for which acupuncture can be used not only as an analgesic but also as an antispasmodic. In controlled studies on biliary colic (62-64) and renal colic (7, 65, 66), acupuncture appears to have advantages over conventional drug treatments (such as intramuscular injection of atropine, pethidine, anisodamine (a Chinese medicine structurally related to atropine, isolated from Anisodus tanguticus), bucinnazine (also known as bucinperazine) or a metamizole-camylofin combination). It provides a better analgesic effect in a shorter time, without side-effects. In addition, acupuncture is effective for relieving abdominal colic, whether it occurs in acute gastroenteritis or is due to gastrointestinal spasm (67).

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Last updated: May 4, 2012