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Acupuncture: Review and Analysis of Reports on Controlled Clinical Trials
(87 pages)

Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
Open this folder and view contentsIntroduction
Open this folder and view contents1. General considerations
close this folder2. Review of clinical trial reports
close this folder2.1. Pain
View the document2.1.1. Head and face
View the document2.1.2. Locomotor system
View the document2.1.3. Gout
View the document2.1.4. Biliary and renal colic
View the document2.1.5. Traumatic or postoperative pain
View the document2.1.6. Dentistry
View the document2.1.7. Childbirth
View the document2.1.8. Surgery
View the document2.2. Infections
View the document2.3. Neurological disorders
View the document2.4. Respiratory disorders
View the document2.5. Digestive disorders
View the document2.6. Blood disorders
View the document2.7. Urogenital disorders
View the document2.8. Gynaecological and obstetric disorders
View the document2.9. Cardiovascular disorders
View the document2.10. Psychiatric disorders and mental disturbances
View the document2.11. Paediatric disorders
View the document2.12. Disorders of the sense organs
View the document2.13. Skin diseases
View the document2.14. Cancers
View the document2.15. Other reports
View the document3. Diseases and disorders that can be treated with acupuncture
View the document4. Summary table of controlled clinical trials
View the documentReferences
 

2.1.5. Traumatic or postoperative pain

For traumas such as sprains, acupuncture is not only useful for relieving pain without the risk of drug dependence, but may also hasten recovery by improving local circulation (68-70). Acupuncture analgesia to relieve postoperative pain is well recognized and has been confirmed in controlled studies (71-76). The first successful operation under acupuncture analgesia was a tonsillectomy. This was, in fact, inspired by the success of acupuncture in relieving post-tonsillectomy pain. Post-tonsillectomy acupuncture was re-evaluated in a controlled study in 1990, which not only showed prompt alleviation of throat pain, but also reduction in salivation and promotion of healing in the operative wound (76).

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Last updated: May 4, 2012